Skip to content

SEE AND EXPLORE

Note that Salo Art Museum is closed for renovation until January 2021.

EXHIBITIONS

23.1.-25.4.2020 TOGETHER – Vintage photographs of communities in Salo area

In Spring 2021 Salo Art Museum presents a followup to its exhibition from 2014, Salo in Old Photographs. The exhibition showcases photographs taken in the centre of Salo, aswell as in the neighbouring villages and towns which are now part of the same joint municipal authority. The photographs depict villages and communities of people working and spending time together, celebrating their special days and living their everyday life. The old photographs tell stories about the daily chores in the fields and forests during the early decades of last century, work communities, mills and factories, but also about leisure time activities, such as sports competitions or communal singing and dance halls. In other words, the photographs depict events and gatherings bringing people together.

FUTURE EXHIBITIONS

15.5.-5.9.2021 AITO VAI EI? GENUINE OR NOT?
24.9.2021-9.1.2O22 PETRI ALA-MAUNUS

PAST EXHIBITIONS

EVENTS

Salo Art Museum is closed until January 2020. We will inform later about our events.

MUSEUM BUILDING

The building of the Salo Art Museum is an old locomotive shed. More than 100 years old, the roundhouse has in its history gone through several phases of expansion. As a result of the last expansion, the building was converted into a modern art museum. The old brick section was renovated into exhibition halls, and next to that was built a new section, in which offices and work areas, art storage, and an on-demand café are located. The roundhouse was opened as an art museum in October 1998.

OLD LOCOMOTIVE

In the inner courtyard of the museum stands a locomotive on the rotating turntable. The locomotive was purchased at the time of the museum´s opening from the Locomotive Park of Haapamäki. The renovation of the “chicken” type of locomotive was done by the Locomotive Museum Association of Haapamäki. The locomotive is dated to 1921, and it was in use until 1970. It got its nickname due to its characteristic “pecking” type of movement.