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SEE AND EXPLORE

EXHIBITIONS

The 90th Anniversary of Turku Printmakers Association: Printed Worlds

28 January – 23 April 2023

The roots of Finnish printmaking trace back to the 1890s, when Akseli Gallen-Kallela created his first woodcuts. By the 1930s, printmaking was being practised as a separate art form. Gravure printing presses were imported to Finland, and the teaching of printmaking began in Finnish art schools. The Association of Finnish Printmakers was established in Helsinki in 1931. Finland’s oldest local association of printmakers, meanwhile, can be found in Turku: in December 1932, the seven-member Grafica group of artists held, in the Turku Sanomat building, their first exhibition of Turku printmaking. The following year, Turku Printmakers Association was established. The exhibition now on display in Veturitalli marks the association’s 90th anniversary and is being curated by the artist Juha Joro, the association’s honorary chairman. The exhibition includes works by twelve members of Turku Printmakers Association: Annika Dahlsten, Markku Haanpää, Katri Ikävalko, Sirkku Ketola, Heli Kurunsaari, Miina Laine, Teija Lehto, Sara Manninen, Laura Miettinen, Tiina Vainio, Hanna Varis and Jirko Viljanen.

Teija Lehto, There was the road waiting for him, woodcut, 2022

A Real and Vivid Life – Sculptor Ben Renvall 1903–1979

Gallery Sidetrack, 28 January – 23 April 2023

The Salo-born sculptor Ben Renvall was a skilled and well-rounded expert when it comes to sculpture materials. He regarded himself primarily as a ceramicist, and was interested in different casting methods, finishes and techniques. The miniature sculptures in the exhibition ooze Renvall’s expressive and positive attitude with which he depicted life in the Finnish countryside in a “vivid and real” manner. Works celebrating the female form are also included, without forgetting Renvall’s statue of Lauri the Blacksmith, the harbinger of spring in Salo, crowned on the First of May, or the annual Jussi Film Awards.

Artwork: Ben Renvall, Boy with a green hair, 1966.

PAST EXHIBITIONS

MUSEUM BUILDING

The building of the Salo Art Museum is an old locomotive shed. More than 100 years old, the roundhouse has in its history gone through several phases of expansion. As a result of the last expansion, the building was converted into a modern art museum. The old brick section was renovated into exhibition halls, and next to that was built a new section, in which offices and work areas, art storage, and an on-demand café are located. The roundhouse was opened as an art museum in October 1998.

Salo Art museum, photo: Niclas Warius

OLD LOCOMOTIVE

In the inner courtyard of the museum stands a locomotive on the rotating turntable. The locomotive was purchased at the time of the museum´s opening from the Locomotive Park of Haapamäki. The renovation of the “chicken” type of locomotive was done by the Locomotive Museum Association of Haapamäki. The locomotive is dated to 1921, and it was in use until 1970. It got its nickname due to its characteristic “pecking” type of movement.